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cedar root tray

cedar root tray

Description:

This is cedar root tray. The wood is dirty and there are broken strips around the edges and handles. The baskets had mold growth previously so it has been vacuumed and there are some stains on the bottom and sides. Some strips have come loose and broken off and there is some darkened discolouration around the edges. There is a red and black diamond pattern on the face of the basket. The basket was found in Kaslo, BC and shipped to the museum after the donor found us online and identified the design as originating from the Coast Salish community. Possibly of St'atl'imx origin.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

015.14.01

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lidded cedar root basket

lidded cedar root basket

Description:

This is a cedar root basket with a lid. The wood is fairly dirty but there are no loose strips. The basket had some mould before so it has been vacuumed. There is a red and black checkered pattern on the lid and differing diamond and triangle patterns on all sides. There is no latch to tie the lid to. Found in Kaslo, BC, there is no known history but it was shipped to Pemberton after it was identified as originating from the Coast Salish community and the donor found the museum online. Possibly of St'atl'imx origin.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

015.13.01

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folk art painting

folk art painting

Description:

An acrylic folk art painting with a metal silver frame painted in 1978 by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. On the back of the frame reads "Artist's Canvas Board - Winsor and Newton", implying that was where the canvas was manufactured from. The floral patterning of the painting is represented as "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", in which it is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. The rosemaling pattern of this particular painting would be Telemark rosemaling. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.04

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painted copper metal disc

painted copper metal disc

Description:

A hand painted copper metal disc that was painted by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. The painted illustration would be considered as "folk art". The floral patterning is represented as "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", in which it is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. This particular patterning on the metal disc would be Rogaland. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.06

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painted two man crosscut saw

painted two man crosscut saw

Description:

An upside down hand painted two man crosscut saw that was painted by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. The painted illustration depicts "folk art". The floral patterning is represented as "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", in which it is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. This particular patterning on the saw would be Rogaland. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. The type of two man crosscut saw would be a lance tooth, due to the patterning and shape of the teeth on the blade (pointed ends). The colours used have oranges, blue, yellows, greens, browns, gold, and reds tinges. Both of the metal bits of the handles has "No. 17 - PAT.D 1930" and "Viktor - Canada" written on either side, in which possibly inscribes where the saw was manufactured from. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.07

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painted wooden leaf serving dish

painted wooden leaf serving dish

Description:

A hand painted wood carved serving dish that is shaped like a leaf with a handle painted by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. On the back of the dish has a metal hook attached, in which it possibly was put on display as a decorative art piece. The colours of the illustration have greens, blues, and pink tinges. The illustration painted on the dish is considered as "folk art". The floral patterning is represented as "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", in which it is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. This particular patterning on the serving dish would be Rogaland. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.10

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painted hand held scrub brush with wooden block hanger

painted hand held scrub brush with wooden block hanger

Description:

A hand painted red hand held scrub brush a) that comes with a wooden rectangular block (also painted red) with a metal hook at the top and behind it there is a metal hanger as well b). The colours used in the illustration have white, black, green, oranges, and yellow tinges. It was painted by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. The small illustration on the top of the scrub brush is known as "folk art". The floral patterning is represented as "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", in which it is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. This particular pattern on the scrub brush would be considered as Hallingdal. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.13ab

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four painted figurines

four painted figurines

Description:

Four hand painted figurines made by Teresa Summerskill and they were donated by Laura Burden. a) is a large sized brown painted horse with a rosemaling pattern on the back of the Rogaland style. The colours of the patterning have cream, blue, white, and oranges tinges. b) is a medium sized gray painted horse with a rosemaling pattern on the back of the Rogaland style. The colours of the patterning have orange, blues, green, and white tinges. c) is a small sized red painted horse with a rosemaling pattern on either side having the Hallingdal style. The colours of the patterning have pinks, blue, and white tinges. The floral patterning "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. d) is a small sized bulldog with only some parts of it painted, such as the splotch-like pattern around the eyes and ears and the back. It has black, bits of red around the mouth, and brown tinges. The bulldog figure also has a tiny wire attached around its neck, worn like a collar. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.15abcd

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painted wooden pieces

painted wooden pieces

Description:

Four hand painted flat prism-shaped wood pieces made by Teresa Summerskill and they were donated by Laura Burden. Both a) and b) have illustrations representing "folk art" with the rosemaling pattern of the Telemark style. They are painted identically, except the difference being the slightly changed colour hues. a) has greens, pinks, yellows, and blues tinges, meanwhile b) has also greens, yellows, and bits of blue, though it has purple tinges instead of pink. c) and d) as well have the Telemark style painted on, atlthough both are painted slightly different from each other. This includes one of the pieces in the center of the design is filled with the colour yellow, while the other piece in the center remains colourless aside from the patterning surrounding it. Despite this, they do have the same colour hues of brown, greens, and yellows. The floral patterning, "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.16abcd

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painted wooden pizza board

painted wooden pizza board

Description:

A wooden rectangular pizza board with a leather tied hanger on the top that was painted by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. On the back of the board has a rosemaling pattern representing the Telemark style. The floral patterning, "rosemaling", or also known as "rose painting/decorative painting", is from Norwegian origin and is a mix between Dutch painting and traditional folk art. It was named "rosemaling/rose painting/decorative painting" since during the 17th to 18th century, various artists painted roses and other types of flowers. The three main styles of this specific folk art are called Telemark, Hallingdal, and Rogaland, named after the regions of where they were formed. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. The colours of the illustration have pinks, blues, teal, greens, browns, yellow, and orange tinges. On the front of the board has a printed cartoon of a man wearing a plaid chef hat and apron (also wearing a t-shirt) while holding a kebab in his left hand. The chef hat on the top reads "Backyard Gourmet", in which it was manufactured from that same company name. The cartoon has the colours brown, blue, white, green, and dark brown. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.18

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small table cloth

small table cloth

Description:

A small hand made white table cloth with a patterned art design made by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. On the front of the cloth has a heart and swirl-like pattern intersecting in the middle and along the sides, in which it could have been possibly inspired by folk art. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. The patterned design has the colours red and dark blue. The material could possibly be made out of 100% polyester. For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.21

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krumkake iron

krumkake iron

Description:

A Norwegian/Scandinavian krumkake iron with metal iron handles that was used by Teresa Summerskill and it was donated by Laura Burden. The krumkake iron was used to make traditional krumkake cookies during Christmas time as a Norway tradition. The insides of the two plates of the iron has a flower folk art-like pattern. Folk art encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture or by peasants or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. It is characterized by a naïve style, in which traditional rules of proportion and perspective are not employed. Folk art mainly expresses cultural identity, such as sharing community values, by using various materials of wood, clay, metal, paper, and other resources. It reflects traditional art forms of diverse community groups of ethnic, tribal, religious, occupational, geographical, age- or gender-based, who identify with each other and society at large. On both plates on the outside reads "Made In Norway". For donor biography see description for 021.10.01.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

021.10.38

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stone arrowhead, N'quatqua

stone arrowhead, N'quatqua

Description:

A black stone arrow head carved into a pyramidal section and a lower stem narrower than the base of the pyramid. [2019 update] Small black basalt stone arrowhead. Found within N'quatqua territory in Birken BC. Johnny Jones believes it is close to 3000 years old, although parts of it were carved off more recently.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

989.42.01

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large cedar root basket

large cedar root basket

Description:

Description-rectangular, brown, made of cedar roots. On the basket there is a floral design one on all sides which is made of wild cherry bark and canary grass. There is one side that suffered major damage and is not repairable. The basket is generally brittle. History- Made in the 1940's by Rose Skuki [nee Ward] of Lytton Nation [TlkemchEEn Nation]; in 1987 it was brought to Margaret Lester for repair. Mrs. Lester found it too brittle to work with. The artist, Mrs. Rose Skuki [nee Ward] of Lytton BC, was a noted basket maker. She took commissions from many people to make various baskets. She sold me that particular basket in the 1950's. She died at age 91. [See document file 987.37.01 for more information about Rose Skuki] [Description update Oct 2021, as per John Haugen, Council Member Lytton First Nations - The basket that is attributed to Rose Skuki is incorrect. John knew Rosie Skuki from when he was a child. She made many baskets but not this one. It is actually made by her husband's cousin: Christina James from North Bend, B.C. John says he has a photo of Christina and her two daughters and they have three of Christina James baskets in their collection.]

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

987.37.01

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Native basket

Native basket

Description:

A native basket most likely made in the interior. It has a design of four connected diamonds with the pattern of red, white, black, white, and red. It once belonged to Margaret Furey (nee Ronayne) - she received it from an unknown source. UBC thought that the basket was valuable, comes with care and conservation documents from the UBC Museum of Anthropology. [update 2019] Origin may be Stl’atl’imx territory.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

014.25.01

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