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beaded leather bag

beaded leather bag

Description:

Mrs. Erickson bought this bag at one of Earl Hall's auctions in Mount Currie [Lil'wat Nation]. In sound condition with signs of wear on the attached fold-over section at the top; leather thongs are threaded through opening on one side of this section Below the section of geometric patterned beadwork on front and back are leather fringes with a saw-toothed effect at top. Lining is torn.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

983.31.05

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skirt and vest

skirt and vest

Description:

Vest & Skirt, leather, belonging to Georgina. She had these custom made. Rosie Ross of Mt. Currie made the vest & beading in the 1970's.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

008.04.01ab

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shawl

shawl

Description:

Shawl. A dancing shawl from 1975 from the Leo family in Mt. Currie. Given to Georgina as a gift.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

008.04.02

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chopping tool (stone), Lil'wat

chopping tool (stone), Lil'wat

Description:

[This item was repatriated to Lil'wat Nation Nov 22, 2019]. Cobble spall chopping tool identified at UBC Museum of Anthropology. Reddish brown. Age: may be between 300 and 3000 years old [update 2019] Location where item was found by Fougberg is unknown. [Update 2019] The cobble spall tool was simple to make and handy for many tasks that involved cutting, scraping or digging. Johnny Jones sent a reference from page 348 of James Teit's "Journal of American Folklore", which explains a "Thunder arrowhead". [footnote reads] "A thunder arrowhead is fired by the Thunder. Most are simply large pieces of arrow-stone, generally blocked off more or less, so that they somewhat resemble a spear-head or an arrow-head of huge size". Johnny Jones says the object is associated with the Haitlo'laux (Grizzly Clan) and shares pg. 348 from Journal of American Folk-lore by James Teit, "when he came out of the [sweat] house, he was at once changed to resemble a Hailo'laux with much red hair all over his body. The hair of his head also assumed a red colour".].

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

989.01.01

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hand maul, Lil'wat

hand maul, Lil'wat

Description:

[This item was repatriated to Lil'wat Nation Nov 22, 2019]. Granite hand maul. Column, flat topped. Below the top a slight bulge tapers to an area for gripping. Below that the column flares gradually to a base wider than the top. History: About 1950, ploughing a field belonging to Nelson Fraser, Mr. Fougberg found the maul in two sections. Later someone glued the parts together. In 1956 Mrs. Fraser gave the maul to the finder. [Update 2019] Hand mauls are almost exclusive to the indigenous people of the southern coast. The hand maul required hard stone not prone to cracking or chipping; it was used to pound wedges into a cedar log to split off planks, as well as for other woodworking requirements. The maul was made by pecking and grinding techniques. A stone of suitable size and material was selected, pecked to the required shape, ground smooth, then polished with a piece of oiled hide. [See publication "Stone, Bone, Antler & Shell" by Hilary Stewart, 1996 - shared by Johnny Jones].

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

988.26.01

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moccasins

moccasins

Description:

Lil'wat Moccasins made for Thord "Slim" Fougberg by Adeline (Mrs. George) Williams, but because Mr. Fougberg's feet were larger than expected, Mr. Fougbergs wife, Margaret, wore the moccasins instead. Made of buckskin and decorated with multi-colored glass bead designs of flowers on the top. Beads are orange, white and blue along the seam and flowers are pink, yellow, blue, and green.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

019.02.01ab

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Cedar Root Tray

Cedar Root Tray

Description:

Small cedar root tray woven with red, white, and black designs. Woven by Diane Gabriel from the Lil'wat nation, who was employed at the museum for the Job Development Program.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

988.29.01

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Cedar Root Basket

Cedar Root Basket

Description:

Small rectangular cedar root basket with black and red heart shape design. Edges decorated with woven braid. Made by Zena Gabriel.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

989.19.01

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top section of stone maul, Lil'wat

top section of stone maul, Lil'wat

Description:

[This item was repatriated to Lil'wat Nation Nov 22, 2019]. Possibly half of the maul has broken off. It was found in the general area of Guthrie's (now Hoffman's) farm possibly on H. Menzel's land or among gravel on the road. In the late 50's Mrs. Guthrie saw a young boy using the maul as a hammer she persuaded him to give it to her. [update 2019] Hand mauls are almost exclusive to the indigenous people of the southern coast. The hand maul required hard stone not prone to cracking or chipping; it was used to pound wedges into a cedar log to split off planks, as well as for other woodworking requirements. The maul was made by pecking and grinding techniques. A stone of suitable size and material was selected, pecked to the required shape, ground smooth, then polished with a piece of oiled hide. [See publication "Stone, Bone, Antler & Shell" by Hilary Stewart, 1996 - shared by Johnny Jones].

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

983.56.06

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Black stone maul, Lil'wat

Black stone maul, Lil'wat

Description:

[This item was repatriated to Lil'wat Nation Nov 22, 2019]. Black stone maul used for grinding or as a hammer. This black stone tool was found by Hjelt about 1967 as he worked with a grader spreading gravel near Smuk's place about 17 miles upriver from Pemberton Village. The gravel had come from the river bank. In Mount Currie, Hjelt had seen similar stone to that in the tool. It is in sound condition, slightly worn at the top. It was found on Bank of the Lillooet river above Smuks (Upper Meadows). Found in gravel near river bank. [update 2019] Hand mauls are almost exclusive to the indigenous people of the southern coast. The hand maul required hard stone not prone to cracking or chipping; it was used to pound wedges into a cedar log to split off planks, as well as for other woodworking requirements. The maul was made by pecking and grinding techniques. A stone of suitable size and material was selected, pecked to the required shape, ground smooth, then polished with a piece of oiled hide. [See publication "Stone, Bone, Antler & Shell" by Hilary Stewart, 1996 - shared by Johnny Jones].

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

983.03.01

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spinning whorl, Lil'wat

spinning whorl, Lil'wat

Description:

Indigenous women say that this device was used to wind goats hair. It is a round disk on a pointed wooden stick broken at one end. Condition- good but worn. See pp. 3 & 5 of Indian Spinning, Knitting, Basketry-Elizabeth Hawkins.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

985.10.36

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dugout canoe, Lil'wat Nation

dugout canoe, Lil'wat Nation

Description:

One dug out canoe found on the upper Lillooet River. Two local men walked across the ice in winter to go hunting and found the canoe under an overhang of rock and it was filled with ice. It was thawed at Bruce Miller's and taken to the museum. Florence Bilenduke remembers it was Bob Mitchell that dropped it off and he didn't sign a gift form as the item was found. Johnny Jones - Lil'wat cultural technician with the Land & Resource office, has provided information about the canoe. It was marking a spot where there were rock paintings and he believes it is quite old due to the thinness of the canoe. Johnny says modern made canoes tend to be thicker walled as it requires a high level of skill and craftsmanship to get the walls so thin. Johnny provided some information about Lil'wat traditions and a map that indicates where the canoe was found on the river. The canoe belonged to Chief Johnny Andrew of Lil'wat Nation.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

009.04.01

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cedar root tray

cedar root tray

Description:

Tray is made primarily of cedar root, the base of strips of cedar tree. Black and red designs made of wild cherry bark, and the white shiny pieces are made of sun bleached straw. The basket tray has a double braid on the top. Made by Margaret Lester from the Lil'wat nation. Margaret specified that the tray be put on Katherine Wallace's desk and there it used to sit holding pencils, scissors etc.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

988.16.01

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round cedar root mat

round cedar root mat

Description:

A round cedar root woven mat with four-pointed design in red cherry bark. Made by Sandra Lester as a required offering under the Job Development Program.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

988.30.01

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cedar root basket

cedar root basket

Description:

Small round cedar root basket with a lid. It is well made and has white, black, and red patterns. Made by Sandra Lester.

Date of Creation:

Accession #:

989.20.01

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