Pemberton Wildlife Association

Pemberton Wildlife Association
deer head

deer head

Description:

A large taxidermied deer head, known as the "Ed Ronayne Buck", that was killed on October 28, 1970 by Ed Ronayne at the headwaters of Johnny Sandy Creek in the upper Pemberton Valley. It is the largest deer head ever harvested in Pemberton, as well as Pemberton deer are a mix between black tailed and mule deer. Ed Ronayne was an avid, experienced hunter who won the Pemberton Wildlife Association's "Annual Antler Contest" five times in the first six years it was held. Young hunters visited his home in Pemberton Meadows to share their hunting stories and learn the "art of hunting". The deer head was first displayed on Ed's kitchen wall before being donated by the Ronayne family and was widely known as "The Wall Of Fame". The antlers on the deer head has ten points, in which the age range of when it was caught is roughly estimated to be around 2-4 years.

Date of Object:

1970

Accession #:

021.06.01

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ram skull and horns

ram skull and horns

Description:

A ram skull and horns, known as the "Pierre Jim Ram", that was killed by Pierre Jim in the fall of 1935 on the bluffs above the railway tracks, just to the west of Mount Currie. It was the only wild sheep (Anderson-Seton/California Bighorn) to ever be taken in Pemberton, specifically the areas of Mount Currie. It is assumed that when the ram was still alive, it wandered off from its home range (which was quite common for wild sheep to do so) and fell in the hands of a hunter. The ram skull and horns was adorned to the entrance of the Mount Currie pool until the building was demolished. Afterwards, Pierre Jim's grandson, Lloyd Williams, retrieved the skull and horns and kept them at his shed for many years. Lloyd eventually agreed that the trophy was more appropriate to be donated and displayed at the Museum. He felt that the prized possession would be properly cared for there, "rather than laying in my woodshed", and that more people will be able to view it at the Museum.

Date of Object:

1935

Accession #:

012.11.01

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